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ESSENTIAL SKILLS INVENTORY ASSESSOR’S GUIDE

Conducted in a manner that engages the apprentice and helps build confidence, the completed Inventory provides a picture of the apprentice’s learning needs while recognizing the skills that have already been acquired. The Inventory is as much a process as a product. The time required to complete an Inventory will vary depending on the apprentice but should be completed in one and a half to two hours. Six of the nine.

Essential Skills are assessed in these Inventories and are in this order: reading text (technical language), document use, numeracy, oral communication, computer use and writing. The Inventory is divided into sections and the section questions are ordered from simple to complex. Sit beside, not across from, the apprentice as a table or desk impedes good communication and can be interpreted as one person be ing in a p osition of authority over anot her. If a round ta ble is available, use it.

Apprentices are n ot often asked to self asse ss, but w ill do so wi llingly if t hey ar e comfortable with the assessor and understand the process. The concept of Essential Skills and Essential Skills Profiles will likely be new to the apprentice. At the beginning of the interview therefore, introduce the trade-specific Essential Skills Profile.

Give the apprentice a hard copy of the profile to take away with him/her. Encourage a thorough review of the profile as well as the Essential Skills website (www.hrsdc.gc.ca/essentialskills) for additional information.

Lastly comment

When introducing the profile, include these points: ¾ The profiles are Canadian. They were developed by interviewing fellow tradespersons, supervisors, managers and researchers in workplaces across the country.

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